Demi Lovato Remains Hospitalized With 'Complications' 6 Days After Overdose

demi-lovato

Demi Lovato remains in a Los Angeles hospital six days after an apparent drug overdose.

According to TMZ, Demi is “suffering extreme nausea and a high fever,” among other “complications” related to the OD. While doctors have yet to decide when Demi can be released from the hospital, a source told the site that "She is under the care of medical experts and is expected to make a full recovery.”

As previously reported, the “Sober” singer was found unconscious by paramedics in her L.A. home on Tuesday (July 24). While Demi refused to tell EMTs what drug or drugs she had taken, her friend reportedly revived her with Narcan — an emergency treatment for narcotic overdoses. 

Since her hospitalization, Demi has been surrounded by her family and former boyfriend Wilmer Valderrama, according to multiple reports. 

Demi reportedly plans to seek drug abuse treatment after she is released from the hospital. As Demi fans know, the 25-year-old singer has long fought a battle with substance abuse. 

Her alleged overdose came only weeks after she admitted to relapsing following six years of sobriety. Demi made the shocking revelation on her latest single, “Sober” where she sings, "Momma, I'm so sorry, I'm not sober anymore/ And daddy, please forgive me for the drinks spilled on the floor/ To the ones who never left me/ We've been down this road before/ I'm so sorry, I'm not sober anymore.”

Demi’s fans held a meet up in Atlantic City, New Jersey on Thursday (July 26) — the date she was scheduled to perform at Atlantic City BeachFest Concert — to send their support and well wishes to their idol.

 

Fans showed up by the dozens with signs and banners all wishing for Demi’s speedy recovery. The crowd even sang a number of Demi’s hits, including, “Sober,” and “Tell Me You Love Me.”

If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357).

Photo: Getty Images

title

Content Goes Here